Research

Nicole Wilson is a scholar of settler origin whose work examines the relationship between Indigenous peoples, the environment and governance. Much of her work focuses on Indigenous water governance in Arctic and sub-Arctic regions of North America.

She aim to contribute to transformative change that addresses the pressing environmental challenges facing Indigenous peoples and their territories. More specifically, I engage with the consequences of historical and ongoing settler-colonialism including environmental injustice, marginalization of Indigenous forms of governance and exclusion from colonial legal and policy frameworks.

Research Themes

  • Community-Based Monitoring
  • Environmental Change and Transformation
  • Indigenous Ontologies and Epistemologies
  • Indigenous water governance
  • Political Ecology
  • Settler-Colonialism and Indigenous-State Relations
  • Social and Environmental Impact Assessment
  • Water Governance and Policy

Doctoral Research
Doctoral research examining how Indigenous water governance is shaped by the modern land claims in Yukon, Canada. This research was conducted in partnership with four Yukon First Nations (Carcross/Tagish, Kluane, Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in and White River) and the Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council (YRITWC).

This included a study of Indigenous-led community-based monitoring in the Yukon River Basin. This research was based on a case study of the Indigenous Observation Network – one of the largest Indigenous-led water quality monitoring networks in the world.

Community-Based Research in the Yukon River Basin
Co-PI and Social Scientist on a series of three Community-Based Research projects (2012-2015) with the five Yukon First Nations and the Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council. These multidisciplinary projects document First Nation concerns about the impacts of climate change and contaminants on water and develop a Community-Based Water Quality Monitoring network:

“Integrating Indigenous Knowledge and Public Health Concerns into a Community Contaminant and Climate Change Monitoring Program.” Awarded by Health Canada, Climate Change and Health Adaptation Program for Northern First Nations and Inuit Communities 2012-2013. Lead-PI and Co-PIs: Ryan Toohey, Shannon Donovan and Nicole Wilson (Community Report). 

“Climate Adaptation Strategies: An Intergenerational Effort to Combine Indigenous Knowledge and Western Science.” Awarded by Health Canada, Climate Change and Health Adaptation Program for Northern First Nations and Inuit Communities 2013-2014. Lead-PI and Co-PIs: Ryan Toohey, Shannon Donovan and Nicole Wilson (Community Report).

Research project titled “First Nation Climate Change Policy: A regional, Indigenous approach to climate change adaptation, health and water governance” Awarded by Health Canada, Climate Change and Health Adaptation Program for Northern First Nations and Inuit Communities 2014-2015. Lead-PI and Co-PIs: Edda Mutter, Shannon Donovan and Nicole Wilson (Community Report).

Master’s Research
I conducted my MS thesis research on the socio-cultural effects of climate change on the subsistence livelihoods of the Koyukon Athabascan people of Ruby, Alaska. This research was conducted in partnership with the Ruby Tribal Council and the Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council.

Advertisements